ICD-10 Holiday Code of the Week | Intentional Self Poisoning, Tryptophan

In the third installment of our ICD-10 Countdown to the Holidays Code of the Week Series,  AntWorks has chosen T50.3X2D, Poisoning by electrolytic, caloric and water-balance agents, intentional self-harm, subsequent encounter. Essentially this translates to the intentional self poisoning with tryptophan.   Anyone that has ever celebrated Thanksgiving is well aware of that drowsy feeling induced by overeating at Thanksgiving Dinner. But, did you know that your sleepiness is actually caused by tryptophan in your beloved turkey? We have all actually been self poisoning ourselves with tryptophan every Thanksgiving, and may have never known! While we do love our turkey leftovers, make sure you plan for an extra nap in your day the next time you consume a large amount of turkey. Stay tuned next week for our fourth ICD-10 Holiday Code of the Week, and remember, if you’re struggling with your medical coding or billing vendor, AntWorks can be the next solution for your medical practice! Is your medical practice looking for new medical software solutions? AntWorks can assist with your EHR, Practice Management, Revenue Cycle Management and Medical Scheduling needs. Contact us or rquest a demo today to learn more. Request a...

A Blog Stuffed With ICD-10 Thanksgiving Themed Codes

In order to properly celebrate Thanksgiving, the only holiday that promises great food, loads of leftovers, wonderful company and a lengthy nap in the middle of the day, we’ve put together a list of Thanksgiving Themed ICD-10 codes. What do we think of when we hear ‘Thanksgiving’? How about family and friends, pumpkin pie, food induced napping, football, crazed shoppers, and, of course, turkey? Continue reading for our list of ICD-10 Thanksgiving Codes.     If You’re Hunting Your Own Turkey this Thanksgiving Pecked By Turkey (W61.43XA): There is no need to explain. All of you hunters out there, stay safe. We heard that turkeys have some foul tempers. (See what we did there?) So Maybe You’re Stuck in the Kitchen Cooking Contact with Powered Kitchen Appliance (W29.0): We’ve all been there. You’re running around the kitchen like a mad (wo)man trying to get the Thanksgiving Dinner finished on time, and you burn your arm on the oven rack or make contact with the electric mixer. For Those Who Expect to Eat Their Weight in Turkey Burn of mouth Pharynx (T28.0XXA): Make sure to take your time while eating to avoid any potential consumption-related injuries. Slowness and Poor Responsiveness (R45.4): Have you ever heard of tryptophan? The turkey’s almost bathed in it. Watch your turkey consumption or you may end up napping through leftovers! If You’ve Had a Recent Falling Out With Your Family Problems in Relationship with the In-Laws (Z63.1): Whether you’re in a small tiff or you’ve just gone World War III on your In-Laws, remember that it’s the Holidays. Kumbaya, my friends. Sibling Rivalry (Z62.891): Whether you’re the youngest,...

How to Handle Negative Online Physician Reviews

As the average patient becomes more and more digitally connected, online physician reviews and rating websites are taking a larger role in a practice’s ability to attract new patients. Similar to personal recommendations and referrals, positive online reviews are also becoming an essential component to draw new patients. Assuming that you’re a good physician, most of your online reviews will likely be positive, but how do you handle a negative review?   A negative online review can often ruin your day, particularly if you feel that review isn’t 100% deserved. In this situation, it can be tempting to lash out against the reviewer online, among other things, in response, but remember this one rule of the internet: anything that you post online will live on forever. If you repeat that statement three more times to yourself after receiving a negative physician review, you could save yourself from a grave mistake. Remember: if you currently have a good amount of positive reviews, any outlier negative review will be diluted by the others.  Still, it’s important to know how to respond to a negative review, and what you can take away from them.   Responding to a Negative Online Physician Review First, decide whether the review was warranted. Negative reviews offer valuable feedback (no matter how poorly expressed), including feedback that patients are too afraid to tell their physicians directly.  Take a moment to read through the negative review, research the patient and their history with your practice, and decide for yourself whether the review was warranted. It’s no surprise that people sometimes overreact, so you may encounter fake or slightly fabricated negative reviews, but remember to...

ICD-10 Holiday Code of the Week | Fall From Stairs and Steps Due to Ice and Snow

In the second installment of our ICD-10 Countdown to the Holidays Code of the Week Series,  AntWorks has chosen W00.1: Fall from stairs and steps due to ice and snow.   Now, this week’s code may not be holiday themed per se, but it is relevant for those of you living in states that get moderate to heavy snow fall in the winter. Have you ever taken a fall down some icy stairs or slipped on black ice?  If not, you’re a lucky one.  There have been many a times when we’ve seen our life flash before our eyes during a slip down the icy stairs. For reference, see the clip below that shows Marv from Home Alone.     Our point? Any fall due to ice or snow could land you hurting in your Doctor’s office. Thankfully, we now have W00.1 to cover all of the scrapes, cuts, and bruises that could appear due to a fall from ice or snow. Stay tuned next week for our third ICD-10 Holiday Code of the Week, and remember, if you’re struggling with your medical coding or billing vendor, AntWorks can be the next solution for your medical practice! Is your medical practice looking for new medical software solutions? AntWorks can assist with your EHR, Practice Management, Revenue Cycle Management and Medical Scheduling needs. Contact us or rquest a demo today to learn more. Request a Demo...

4 Key Findings From the 2015 Practice Profitability Index

The Practice Profitability Index (PPI) — a survey of more than 5,000 physicians — provides a look into the issues affecting the financial and operational health of physician practices across the US, serving as a barometer of the current state of the average practice and providing insight into physician outlooks on the year ahead.   This year’s PPI revealed “room for cautious optimism”, with a lesser amount of physicians forecasting negative profitability than in the 2014 PPI. This year’s PPI also showed that, while respondents with positive projections still represent the smallest segment, physicians across the board are investing in practice operations to counter continued regulatory challenges, financial pressures, and administrative burdens. Continue reading below to learn more about the key findings from the 2015 Practice Profitability Index. Profitability Outlooks In the 2015 Practice Profitability Index, Physicians expecting profitability the be flat over the coming year (35%) represented a greater share than those expecting a downward trend (31%) in profitability. Twenty-four percent of physicians anticipated a positive trend in profitability, up 19% from the 2014 PPI, and 10% of physicians were unsure of what they anticipated. Overall, in contrast to prior years, this year’s Practice Profitability Index revealed a moderate upswing in physician profitability projections. Continuing Challenges to Profitability As physicians consider the year ahead, the top challenges they anticipate are: Declining Reimbursements Rising Costs The Transition to ICD-10 The Affordable Care Act Time Spent Performing Administrative Duties Declining reimbursement and rising costs were the top two challenges physicians cited in this year’s Practice Profitability Index, but the transition to ICD-10 replaced the Affordable Care Act at number three. More than half of physicians identified ICD-10 as a factor weighing down...

7 Social Media Tips for Medical Practices

Today, the modern patient lives in a ‘wired’ world with unlimited access to any information they might seek out. Included in this abundance of online knowledge and information is the expectation that their physicians, too, are accessible 24/7 through digital means. However, many physicians are still fighting this trend, leery of wading into the uncharted waters of their online presence.     While it is true that creating an online presence is a bit of an upfront challenge, refusing to embrace the growing ‘wired’ trends could ultimately harm your practice. What do we mean by wired trends? Well, we’re not just talking about creating a website, here.  What we’re really aiming at is the creation, management and promotion of social media accounts for your medical practice to communicate openly with your patients. Younger tech-savvy patients expect to see their physicians online, and if they don’t, they may just choose to leave your practice for one that has a more robust online presence.      7 Tips to Get Your Medical Practice Started With Social Media   So how do you get started with social media for your medical practice? Here are 7 tips to get your practice started. Check out our tips and hints below.   1. Define Your Audience The first tip we can give is to define your audience. A lot of people would stop us here and say, “well, I serve a lot of people. So, my audience must be everyone.” That’s where you’re wrong. By serving ‘everyone’, you end up serving no one, and that could lose you many hours of work and a lot of patience. Defining an audience is easy...