ICD-10 Code of the Week | Accidental Kick by Another Person

In our final ICD-10 Code of the Week installment, AntWorks has chosen W50.1xxS – Accidental kick by another person, sequela.     Do you play a lot of sports involving your feet – soccer, football, field hockey, lacrosse, martial arts? Spend a lot of time helping others try on shoes at a shoe store? Maybe you just have some overly active younger siblings? Well we (unfortunately) know what it feels like to be kicked in the head, and you probably do too. Thank goodness there’s a code for that! Keep alert near others’ feet, and stay safe! Thanks for sticking with us through our ICD-10 Code of the Week series. Here’s to hoping your medical practice has a great ICD-10 implementation day, and if you’re “kicking yourself in the head” for not preparing for ICD-10, make sure to give AntWorks a call. Is your medical practice ready for the ICD-10 changeover? AntWorks is. Contact us today to learn how our company can assist your practice in the ICD-10 transition before October 1, 2015. Request a Demo...

A Few Creepy ICD-10 Codes Just in Time for Halloween

In order to break the tension from the transition to ICD-10, AntWorks thought we would compile a list of creepy sounding ICD-10 codes that remind us of Halloween and our favorite Halloween movies. Read on if you dare, but some of these could lead to a F51.5 (nightmare disorder). Halloween Night Here are a few codes that may come in handy on Halloween night. From DIY costumes to lack of street lighting, we’ve mapped out any issues that may arise on all hallows-eve.   Dressing up in costume Y93.D (Activities involving arts and handcrafts): If you’ve tried to craft your own Halloween costume, you know it is not an easy feat. Use this code for hot-glue-gun burns and cuts from scissors. Eating unwrapped candy T78.01 (Anaphylactic reaction due to peanuts):With a pillowcase full of candy, who knows what your kids will eat? Some kids may be lucky enough to stay away from the unwrapped candy, but for a child with a peanut allergy, a trip to the ER could close out the night. Taking Halloween too seriously Y04.1 (Assault by human bite): If a vampire or zombie takes their costume a bit too seriously, this code is necessary. Lack of street lighting W22.02XD (Walking into a lamp post): If your streets aren’t well lit and you don’t carry a flashlight, you may end up needing this code after a trip to your doctor.   The Movies If you’re a big scary movie buff, then you will probably recognize the Halloween flicks below. But, we’re crossing our fingers that you’ll never need a Doctor to use these codes for your visit to the office!   Dracula X32.XXXA (Exposure to sunlight)...

The ICD-10 Webinars Are Now Available Online

Did you miss AntWorks’ Electronic Health Record and Practice Management ICD-10 Readiness Webinars? Fear not! Both webinars have been uploaded online to our client portal.     The ICD-10 deadline is just two days away. In case you missed the first round of free live webinars held for our Benchmark Clinical customers, we now have recordings of the Electronic Health Record webinar and the Practice Management slide deck available to you online. Both the recording of the Electronic Health Record session and the slide deck files are available via our Client Portal on our web site. For the Practice Management webinar, only the slide deck files have been uploaded. AntWorks highly recommends that all of our clients watch our free Electronic Medical Record ICD-10 Readiness Webinar, or view the Practice Management webinar slide deck to ensure that your practice is ready for the ICD-10 transition. These webinars cover all aspects of our Practice Management and Electronic Health Record software usage related to the upcoming ICD-10 deadline. How Do I Access These Resources? To access the Electronic Health Record resources, visit the ‘Client Login’ link near the top right hand side of this screen.  Once logged in, under the ‘Customer Area’, click on the ‘EMR Resource Center’.  Links to the recorded webinar and slide deck are under the ‘ICD-10’ heading. To access the Practice Management slide deck, visit the ‘Client Login’ link near the top right hand side of this screen.  Once logged in, under the ‘Customer Area’, click on the ‘PM Resource Center’ to access the webinar slide deck file. Having Issues? If you experience any issues gaining access to this video or slide deck, please call us...

ICD-10 Code of the Week | Unspecified Balloon Accident Injuring Occupant

In our twelfth ICD-10 Code of the Week installment, AntWorks has chosen V96.00XS unspecified balloon accident injuring occupant, sequela.     So you recently decided to take a ride in a hot air ballon? We’ve all seen the movie Up!, so you can’t really be surprised at the outcome from this event. Balloons and people were really just never meant to work out, and now we can use you as a prime example for that statement. Next time you decide to take a ride in the air, just stick to an airplane. Stay tuned next week for our thirteenth ICD-10 Code of the Week! There’s only one more installment left in the series.   Is your medical practice ready for the ICD-10 changeover? AntWorks is. Contact us today to learn how our company can assist your practice in the ICD-10 transition before October 1, 2015. Request a Demo...

On ICD-10 Release Date, CMS Says Four States Are Exempt

On October 1, 2015, the ICD-10 implementation date, four state Medicaid programs won’t be transitioning to ICD-10 like the other 46. Instead, they have received CMS approval to take incoming claims coded in the new ICD-10 system, convert them into ICD-9 codes, and use the older system to calculate payments to healthcare providers.     All HIPAA-covered entities, including hospitals, office-based physicians, claims clearinghouses and health plans must comply with the federal mandate for full ICD-10 conversion on Oct. 1. But the CMS has signed off on a “crosswalk” approach to translate ICD-10 codes into ICD-9 codes and keep using the older codes as a workaround for Medicaid fee-for-service programs in California, Louisiana, Maryland and Montana. These four states “are the only [ones] that have programmed the backwards crosswalk into their claims processing systems for their fee-for-service providers,” Jibril Boykin, press officer at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), said in an email. Every other state and provider, however, is still federally mandated to convert to the code set on October 1, 2015. “We have worked closely with each state to understand how they will mitigate any issues that may arise and minimize impact on the accuracy and timeliness of provider payments,” said Boykin. It is “not a long-term approach,” and the “crosswalk” approach “varies on a state-by-state basis.” Explaining the Crosswalk Approach   As for the crosswalk approach, the four states “are going to take in [an ICD-10] code, they are going to crosswalk it to [an ICD-9] code, [and] adjudicate the claim,” said Robert Tennant, director of health information technology policy at the Medical Group Management Association in Englewood, Colorado. “So, that means they basically haven’t converted...