ICD-10 Code of the Week | Water Skis on Fire

In our second  ICD-10 Code of the Week installment, AntWorks has chosen V91.07XD: Burn due to water skis on fire.   Now, we’re not sure how many patients you’ve treated that were suffering from burns caused by their water skis catching fire, but thankfully for those patients, ICD-10 has a code for that! In the past, these odd tragedies were complicated even more by the shortcomings of an outdated and vague coding standard. Now, your water skiing enthusiasts are covered, even when their skis catch on fire.  Stay tuned next week for our third ICD-10 Code of the Week.   Is your medical practice ready for the ICD-10 changeover? Benchmark System is. Contact us today to learn how our company can assist your practice in the ICD-1o transition before October 1, 2015. Request a Demo  ...

CMS says it won’t deny ICD-10 claims for a year, gets American Medical Association backing

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the American Medical Association (AMA) are taking steps to ensure that the transition to the new ICD-10 diagnosis codes is easier for physicians.     On Monday, the groups jointly announced that CMS “is releasing additional guidance that will allow for flexibility in the claims auditing and quality reporting process as the medical community gains experience using the new ICD-10 code set.” In addition, the agency will appoint an ICD-10 ombudsman “to triage and answer questions about the submission of claims.” This Ombudsman will be located in a new ICD-10 Communications and Coordination Center that CMS is setting up. The ICD-10 Grace Period Currently CMS offers “The Road to 10” resource for medical professionals at smaller practices, but realized that this resource, coupled with their training videos, just weren’t enough to fully support the medical community affected by the ICD-10 Coding changes. On Monday, CMS and AMA announced that “for 12 months after ICD-10 implementation, Medicare review contractors will not deny physician or other practitioner claims billed under the Part B physician fee schedule…based solely on the specificity of the ICD-10 diagnosis code as long as the physician/practitioner used a valid code from the right family.” This grace period also applies to codes submitted in connection with the Meaningful Use program, Value Based Modifier (VBM), and the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS).   So what does this mean for physicians in basic terms? The new ICD-10 changes address: Claim Denials For the first year that ICD-10 is in place, Medicare will not deny payment for these unintentional errors as practices become accustomed to ICD-10 coding. In...

Would You Add Your Patients on Facebook?

Yet another study has confirmed that Americans want increased online access to medical professionals and information. In fact, findings from a 2,250-person survey show that tech-savvy Americans would even like to add their doctors on Facebook and email them. Around 37% of respondents said they’d emailed a doctor in the past six months, while 18% had tried to reach out via Facebook. Certain groups were more likely than others to seek out electronic contact; younger, non-white, more educated people with higher incomes were the most likely to want to be able to contact their doctors through these nontraditional routes. More than half (57%) said they wanted to be able to access health data via their doctors’ websites, and 46% said they wanted to access their information by email. However, researchers noted, few respondents had actually used existing online patient portals. Only 7% had accessed their health info through a provider’s website. So education, as well as technical innovation, may be part of the picture when it comes to providing the electronic access patients are asking for. The full study, led by Joy Lee of Johns Hopkins, has been published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. Is Web-Based Access Plausible? Given the relatively rapid adoption of electronic health records/medical records, it’s not a huge stretch to look at web based electronic medical records that can provide the type of access patients are asking for (and many web EMRs do include a patient portal). Between 2001 and 2013, the percentage of office-based physicians using EMR software went from 18% to 78%; adoption went up by 21% between 2012 and 2013...

ICD-10 Code of the Week | Struck By Duck

In our first ICD-10 Code of the Week installment, AntWorks has chosen W61.62XD: Struck by Duck, Subsequent Encounter.     Not only has this patient been struck by a duck and received initial care from a physician, but they have also followed up for routine care to the injury during their recovery. We’re not too sure about duck bites from our side of things, but that sounds like a pretty quack-y experience to us! Stay tuned next week for our second ICD-10 Code of the Week.   Is your medical practice ready for the ICD-10 changeover? Benchmark System is. Contact us today to learn how our company can assist your practice in the ICD-1o transition before October 1, 2015. Request a Demo  ...

ICD-10 Code of the Week Series Begins Wednesday July 8

Starting this Wednesday, AntWorks is releasing our ICD-10 Code of the Week series. From now until October 1, 2015, we will be sharing our favorite, most outrageously hilarious ICD-10 codes with our readers.     With CMS introducing more than 68,000 new codes this October, ICD-10 has proven itself to be prepared for the most dire of situations. These codes have reached new levels of specificity that lead us to wonder what’s been going on behind closed doors at medical offices- seriously, though. While this is all in good fun, AntWorks is also very aware that these codes were added for a reason, and hope that anyone seeking medical help for these events will immediately get the medical attention they need.   Make sure to keep an eye out tomorrow for our first ICD-1o Code of the Week, and remember that AntWorks is ready for ICD-10 today. Is your medical practice?  ...