5 Reasons Electronic Medical Records Benefit Both Doctors and Patients

5 Reasons Electronic Medical Records Benefit Both Doctors and Patients   Electronic medical records are fast becoming standard. As of last year, 78% of office-based physicians used some type of EMR software; that’s up from only 18% in 2001. Part of that change is probably due to the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Care Record (EHR) Incentive Programs, which provide monetary incentives for certain kinds of implementation. But the other reason is simply that physicians are seeing the many benefits electronic health records offer both doctors and patients. Here are five to consider:       5 Reasons Why Electronic Medical Records Benefit Doctors and Patients 1. Better Patient Care Having a patient’s information at their fingertips at all times (and on multiple devices, with web based electronic medical records) allows doctors to make more accurate diagnoses and better care recommendations. Electronic medical records can also reduce errors, whether they’re due to a lack of information or the messy handwriting that plagues nearly all handwritten records. Electronic medical records even keep track of prescriptions and allergies and automatically alert doctors as to potential negative interactions. 2. Healthcare Provider Cooperation Electronic records allow various healthcare providers to collaborate, both inside and outside a practice. Nurses, doctors and lab techs can easily share information gathered across visits. And the benefits don’t stop at an individual practice’s doors: an emergency room doctor, for example, could pull up a patient’s electronic record and learn of a serious long-term condition even if that patient were in a coma. There are extensive security measures encoded in EMR software to ensure that only qualified people with the...

3 Ways Electronic Health Records Support Better Patient Care

3 Ways Electronic Health Records Support Better Patient Care   Electronic health records will save the global health industry $78 billion over the next five years, according to a new study conducted by Juniper Research. “Advanced EHRs will provide the ‘glue’ to bring together the devices, stakeholders and medical records in the future connected healthcare environment,” said Anthony Cox, the report’s author and an associate analyst at Juniper. This is just one more indication of what has been clear for several years now: Electronic medical records are an integral part of the near future’s healthcare climate. As of last year, 78% of office-based doctors used an EHR system; in 2001, that figure was only 18%. In fact, the adoption rate went up by 21% between 2012 and 2013 alone.     It’s proven that EMR practice management can save physicians money. But one of the biggest controversies regarding electronic medical records is whether they can actually improve quality of care. Here are three ways that they can:   Fewer Distractions Any time physicians spend on the logistical aspects of running a practice is time they can’t spend with their patients or on keeping up with the latest medical advancements. EMR software can be integrated with medical billing systems and even appointment software so that doctors can make patient care their primary concern. It’s been shown that EHR systems improve annual efficiency by about 6%. Better Data Collection Electronic health records allow for complete data collection and instantaneous access from a variety of devices. It also standardizes formats for better data comparison and general ease of access. Having as much...

The 5 Criteria That Add Up to a Winning Electronic Health Record System

The 5 Criteria That Add Up to a Winning Electronic Health Record System   There’s no doubt about it: Use of electronic health records systems are on the rise. The number of physicians with at least a basic electronic health record system in place grew by 21% between 2012 and last year alone, and nearly 50% of physicians not currently using one plan to purchase one or implement use of a previously purchased software within a year.     But what should you consider if you’re still shopping around for an EHR system that can bring your practice up to date? Here are the five most important things to keep in mind: Meaningful Use Compliance One of the reasons EHR use has grown so rapidly is because of the financial subsidies offered by The Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Care Record Incentive Programs for medical facilities that can demonstrate “meaningful use” of electronic medical records. There’s been quite a bit of confusion — and flux — over what the government requires in terms of meaningful use, so you’ll want to work with a software company who is staying on top of all the changes. Ease of Use Electronic health records systems can allow for better data management and patient care, but only if they’re easy to use. There’s always a learning curve when you’re adjusting to new software, but you should be putting more focus on your patients than on figuring out what’s happening on your screen. Device Accessibility One of the primary benefits of web based electronic medical records is the ability to access them from multiple devices....

Without Training, Staff Can’t Properly Use Electronic Health Records Software

Without Training, Staff Can’t Properly Use Electronic Health Records Software   Both electronic health records and their more succinct cousins, electronic medical records, are a huge boon to the medical and health care industries. They help standardize forms, terminology, abbreviations, and data input. What’s more, online EHR and online EMR software can also improve a medical facility’s overall efficiency by about 6% per year.   So it’s more than a little surprising that, according to a 2014 survey of the American College of Physicians, family practice physicians spent 48 minutes more a day when they used EMRs. Even stranger, the Medscape Electronic Health Records Report 2014 also found that doctors thought the software decreased the amount of time they could spend with patients. If electronic health records and electronic medical records can make a practice all the more efficient, why then are they eating up so much time? Simple — because medical professionals aren’t being trained to use their facilities’ electronic health records software properly. According to the Medscape Electronic Health Records Report 2014, 70% of doctors claim that they lost face-to-face time with patients as a result of having to figure out a new system. Once properly trained, health care practitioners will find that electronic health records can improve the quality of care they offer, make things more efficient, and even help them screen patients better. After switching from paper to Electronic Health Records, nurses reported in one survey that they saw a reduction in the time it takes to properly document patients by up to 45 percent. What’s more, according to a 2013 study published in the Journal...